Press Release: Ruthless Jabiru and Decibel together in concert for one night only

PRESS RELEASE 
London chamber orchestra Ruthless Jabiru welcomes into its fold fellow Australian musicians Decibel New Music Ensemble for a massed finale to the latter’s forthcoming UK tour. 

The two ensembles will unite for a programme of graphic-, text- and traditionally-notated music performed by an orchestra of entirely low instruments. The event will take place in the unique subaquatic surrounds of the Grand Entrance Hall at the Brunel Museum on 02 December 2022 as part of the UK/Australia Season 2021-22.

Continue reading

Interview: Turning the Page for the Arts

Originally posted at Journal of Beautiful Business:

template-258x173-1A conversation with the conductor and page turner Kelly Lovelady

Tim Leberecht

Artists have suffered tremendously from the pandemic. Many have lost their income and realized that the safety net protecting them is even more fragile than they had feared. Add to this the underlying socio-economic challenges that the cultural critic William Deresiewicz aptly depicts in his recent book, The Death of the Artist: How Creators Are Struggling to Survive in the Age of Billionaires and Big Tech. At first glance, the democratization of the arts through digital technology might let you conclude that “There’s never been a better time to be an artist.” Many artists, however, feel differently: There’s never been a worse time to be one. Despite (or in fact, because of) the gig economy, as well as the long tail of digital platforms and crowdsourced funding mechanisms, revenue for most creators is falling. They may now have “universal access” to the audience, but “at the price of universal impoverishment,” as Deresiewicz puts it.

As we are all desperately wanting to turn the page and open a new chapter, I spoke with someone who’s not just an artist but also professional page turner: London-based Australian conductor Kelly Lovelady. Lovelady is the founding Artistic Director of Ruthless Jabiru, a chamber orchestra dedicated to exploring humanitarian and social justice stories through new music to promote compassion, sustainability, and social consciousness. Continue reading

Interview: Music Lessons Go Digital

Originally posted at Limelight Magazine:

Template 258x173We speak to Australian musicians working around the world about how they are responding to the challenges of teaching music remotely.

By Angus McPherson on April 21, 2020

Many musicians supplement their performing income with teaching work – but just as the concert halls and theatres are closed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, with social distancing measures in force and students staying home from school, music lessons are also being put on hold. Suddenly, music teachers around the country are having to adapt to a new world in which online lessons are the only way to continue making a living. Meanwhile, performing artists facing down the prospect of months without any of their regular income streams are finding ways to make ends meet by offering online Continue reading